Food Service

Food Service Phased Guidelines

Food Service Phased Guidelines

Updated 10/13/2020


As of October 13, 2020, a new tracking system has been enacted by Governor Herbert and the Utah Department of Health. The color coded Phased Guidelines are now a three-tier system. For updated information specific to industry and county, please visit the link below.

Gymnasiums & Fitness Centers

Guidance for Gymnasiums & Fitness Centers

Updated April 20, 2020


Utah’s State Public Health Directive recommends that individuals avoid the businesses & services listed above until further notice. If these businesses and services remain open, they should follow these guidelines:

  • Management should ensure, on a daily basis and at the beginning of each shift, that no employee who presents symptoms consistent with COVID-19 (such as fever, chills, cough, sneezing with nasal discharge, shortness of breath) will be permitted to work. Employees who appear to have any symptoms upon arrival to work or during the work day should be sent home immediately.
  • Patrons should be screened by phone and/or in-person prior to entering the establishment, and should not be allowed to enter if any of the symptoms listed above are present.
  • Management should only allow 1 individual per 100 square feet and ensure at least 10 feet of separation in all directions between patrons.
  • No team or group activities should be allowed.
  • Locker rooms and showers should not be used. Use of toilets, urinals, and sinks is allowed.
  • No sign-in sheets or touch pads should be required for entry.
  • It is strongly recommended that individuals over the age of 60 or who are immuno-compromised not use the facility.
  • It is strongly recommended that all employees and patrons wear a non-surgical mask or face covering that completely covers the nose and mouth whenever possible.

 

Best Practices for Businesses

Adapted from coronavirus.utah.gov/business

COVID-19 Prevention in the Workplace

The highest priority of any business is to protect the health, safety, and life of employees and clients. Every decision emanates from that single objective, including guidelines employees have within their places of business, the flexibility and encouragement they are given to attend to their own health needs — as well as those of their families — and a supportive workplace environment that has considered and prepared for disruptions in services, manufacturing, marketing, sales, and supply chains.  

While many, if not most, businesses may never experience an incident of coronavirus on their premises, almost all will feel the effects of the illness through disruptions in the stock market, a break in the supply chain, or legitimate concerns among employees. Businesses should also be aware of potential shortages for pharmaceutical supplies, health care supplies, and other resources that may be required for needs unrelated to coronavirus or may leave a company unprepared for subsequent emergencies. These are best addressed by advance planning, considering the resources and best practices that encourage healthy engagement and behaviors within the business environment, at the employee’s home, and support throughout the community.

Best practices encouraged by business and health care experts separate into two categories, those who are not feeling well or suspect they have the coronavirus, and those who are feeling well and need to take precautions.

Those who believe they may have been exposed to coronavirus or who are not feeling well should:

  • Be actively encouraged to remain at home except to receive health care.
  • Stay separate and apart from individuals and animals within the home.
  • Call the doctor before visiting to describe symptoms and receive instructions.
  • Wear a facemask in public and among household companions.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes.
  • Clean hands and wash often with soap and water for 20 seconds or an alcohol-based sanitizer.
  • Avoid sharing household items.
  • Clean all “high touch” surfaces every day.
  • Have clothing and bedding washed as frequently as possible.
  • Monitor symptoms and inform healthcare professionals, particularly if they worsen.
  • Confirm illness and contagion have passed before returning to work or public engagement.
  • CDC recommends that employees who appear to have acute respiratory illness symptoms (i.e. cough, shortness of breath) upon arrival to work or become sick during the day should be separated from other employees and be sent home immediately. Sick employees should cover their noses and mouths with a tissue when coughing or sneezing (or an elbow or shoulder if no tissue is available).

Those who are feeling well and have no reason to believe they have been exposed to coronavirus should proceed as they would during any cold and flu season:

  • Perform hand hygiene frequently.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Try to remain in open spaces with good airflow.
  • Maintain a healthy diet and exercise.
  • Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, and clothing items with workmates.
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces, such as counters, desk- and tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, and tablets, every day.
  • Sanitize workspaces and public transportation areas like handles and stabilizing bars in subway cars, as well as arm rests and tray tables in buses, trains, and airplanes.
  • Wash clothing regularly.
  • Maintain a comfortable distance in conversations and in tight working environments, such as where two or more are gathered around a computer.
  • Consider replacing a handshake with a fist bump or friendly salute.

For additional information, please see Interim Guidance for Preventing the Spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Around the office:

  • Place posters that encourage staying home when sick, cough and sneeze etiquette, and hand hygiene at the entrance to your workplace and in other workplace areas where they are likely to be seen.
  • Provide tissues and no-touch disposal receptacles for use by employees.
  • Instruct employees to clean their hands often with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60-95% alcohol, or wash their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Provide soap and water and alcohol-based hand rubs in the workplace. Ensure that adequate supplies are maintained. Place hand rubs in multiple locations or in conference rooms to encourage hand hygiene.
  • Visit the coughing and sneezing etiquette and clean hands web page for more information.
  • Provide disposable wipes so that commonly used surfaces (for example, doorknobs, keyboards, remote controls, desks) can be wiped down by employees before each use.

For more general workplace health and safety information, view the U.S. Chamber’s Coronavirus (COVID-19) Workplace Tips for Employees. You can also download an infographic about social distancing.

Corporate Policy Recommendations

The United States Department of Health and Human Services, along with the Centers For Disease Control, recommends companies:

  • Ensure sick leave policies are flexible and consistent with public health guidance and employees are aware of these policies.
  • Speak with vendors that provide contract or temporary employees about the importance of sick employees staying home and encourage them to develop non-punitive leave policies.
  • Do not require a health care provider’s note for employees who are sick with acute respiratory illness to validate their illness or return to work, as medical providers are extremely busy and likely unable to provide such documentation in a timely way.
  • Maintain flexible policies that permit employees to stay home to care for a sick family member. Employers should be aware that more employees may need to stay at home to care for sick children or other sick family members than is usual.

For more information, view the U.S. Chamber’s Guidance for Employers to Plan and Respond to the Coronavirus (Covid-19).

Remote Work

Should an Emergency Remote Work Plan become necessary due to infection among employees, family members, or the community at large, Cali Williams Yost, CEO and founder of Flex+Strategy Group/Work+Life Fit recommends the following:

  1. Acknowledge the possibility that all or part of your workforce may need to work remotely.
  2. Map out jobs and tasks that could be affected.
  3. Audit available IT hardware and software, and close any gaps in access and adoption.  
  4. Set up a communications protocol in advance.
  5. Identify ways to measure performance that could inform broader change.

Detailed information concerning these recommendations are included in “What’s Your Company’s Emergency Remote-Work Plan?” Harvard Business Review, February 28, 2020.

Employees With Affected Family Members

Employees who are well but who have a sick family member at home with coronavirus should notify their supervisor and refer to CDC guidance for how to conduct a risk assessment of their potential exposure. If an employee is confirmed to have coronavirus, employers should inform fellow employees of their possible exposure in the workplace but maintain confidentiality as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Local Closures

Southwest Utah Public Health Department 

Local Closures

Updated April 14, 2020


The Southwest Utah Public Health Department has implemented Utah’s State Public Health Directives for COVID-19, which makes allowances for outdoor recreation in household groups or individuals who maintain social distancing from others. Utah’s State Parks remain open to county residents.

Garfield County

  • Closures
    • Bryce Canyon National Park
    • Upper and Lower Calf Creek Falls.
    • Deer Creek Campground.
    • All Escalante canyons.
    • Devil’s Rock Garden.
    • Zebra Slot Canyon.
    • Burr Trail (Long Canyon Slots, Big Pines Camp area, etc.).
    • Irish Canyons including Sandthrax Camping area.
    • Hog Springs Canyon.
    • Star Springs Campground.
    • North Wash.
    • Ticaboo/Bullfrog area.
    • And all other recreation sites where proper social distancing practices cannot be achieved.

Kane County

On Monday, April 13, 2020, Kane County relaxed the restrictions placed on travel by non-county residents.  Effective today, some high use areas are designated as “Day Use Only”.

  • Closures
  • Open for Day Use
    • Wire Pass Trailhead
    • Dry Fork Trailhead and its associated slot canyons
    • Elephant Cove Trailhead
    • Hog Canyon
    • The Dry Lakebed at Coral Pink Sand Dunes
    • Peekaboo slot canyon
    • Any other High-Density Recreation Areas where large groups of campers congregate are also open for “Day Use Only”.
  • Primitive or over-night camping that is otherwise allowed in other areas of Kane County is allowed for anyone so long as any single group is limited to ten people or a single household and each group is located at least 50 yards away from any other group.
  • Hiking and ATV use is allowed in all properly designated areas and trails.

Washington County

  • Closures
    • Zion National Park
    • St. George City
      • All four City golf courses (Dixie Red Hills, St. George Golf Club, Sunbrook Golf Club, Southgate Golf Club)
      • All pickleball courts
      • All sport parks
      • The skate park
      • Snake Hollow Bike Park
      • All playgrounds and gazebos until further notice

COVID-19 Archives

Public health agencies are closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a new coronavirus (COVID-19) that was first detected in China in December 2019 and continues to expand in a growing number of countries, including the United States. COVID-19 was declared a pandemic on March 11th, 2020.

Visit our main COVID-19 page for the latest updates and case counts at swuhealth.org/covid.

Archived Updates

St. George Marathon Charity Entries


Foundation

The Southwest Utah Public Health Foundation is an official charity for the St. George Marathon and has been allocated a certain number of marathon entries. Runners who were not selected through the lottery can donate funds to the Foundation and be eligible to receive a guaranteed entry in to the 2019 St. George Marathon.

We have entries available for $125; the marathon registration fee is separate. If interested, please contact:

Jeff Shumway

phone: (435) 986-2585

email: jshumway@swuhealth.org

Holiday Hours

Beaver

We will be closed the following days:

December 24th

December 25th.

December 31st

January 1, 2021


Cedar City

We will be closed the following days:

December 24th at 12:30 PM

December 25th

December 31st at 12:30 PM

January 1, 2021


Kanab

We will be closed the following days:

December 24th

December 25th

December 31st

January 1, 2021


Panguitch

We will be closed the following days:

December 24th

December 25th

December 31st

January 1, 2021


St. George

We will be closed the following days:

December 24th at 12:30 PM

December 25th

December 31st at 12:30 PM

January 1, 2021

E-Cigarette Health Advisory

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has issued a health advisory regarding severe lung disease and the use of e-cigarettes.

Click HERE to read it

 


Click HERE to learn more about e-cigarettes with our Clearing the Vapor course.