COVID-19 Vaccine Update: Ages 70 & Over Can Sign Up Starting January 18th

News Release – January 15, 2021

COVID-19 Vaccine Update: Ages 70 & Over Can Sign Up Starting January 18th

SOUTHWEST UTAH – People aged 70 and over can register starting Monday, January 18th to get their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine. They can sign up at swuhealth.org/covid-vaccine to set up a time at their nearest clinic. A consent form can also be printed from the website to fill out and bring to the appointment. Picture ID and a short-sleeved shirt will also be required. There is no cost for the vaccine although insurance information may be requested. Both full and part-time residents are eligible.

People who don’t have a computer or access to the internet can call to register by phone starting on Tuesday, January 19th. The number will be 435-986-2549. Whether online or by phone, residents may need to keep trying to get through since there is a high demand for vaccines that are shipped to the Southwest Utah Public Health Department (SWUPHD) in limited amounts. It will take many weeks to schedule and vaccinate the 70+ age group.

The SWUPHD will continue vaccinating previous priority groups as well, including non-hospital healthcare workers, first responders, K-12 school staff. Eligibility for other age groups and health conditions will be announced at a later time.

A second dose is needed about a month after the first COVID-19 shot for the best protection against the disease. The state of Utah is recommending that people who have tested positive for COVID-19 wait for 90 days after the positive test to get vaccinated.

Please follow local news sources, our website at swuhealth.org/covid, or social media at swuhealth for COVID-19 updates and vaccine eligibility announcements.

As we see case numbers, hospitalizations, and deaths continue in Southwest Utah from the spread of COVID-19, we encourage all residents to get vaccinated when able and continue to protect your vulnerable loved ones by maintaining distancing, wearing masks when within 6 feet, keeping hands washed, and staying home if sick.

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The mission of the Southwest Utah Public Health Department is to protect the community’s health through the promotion of wellness and the prevention of disease. Visit our website at  www.swuhealth.org

Flu

Flu Shot Clinics

Flu Shot

Get your flu shot while helping us practice our emergency response plans!

Getting immunized is one of the best ways to protect yourself against seasonal influenza. The Southwest Utah Public Health Department has scheduled our annual Flu Shootouts in each of our 5 counties. It’s inexpensive (or NO CHARGE with some insurances, see below)* and convenient. 

* $20 Cash, check, or credit card. $55 for High Dose (ages 65+) and Flu Blok (adults or those with egg allergies)

*NO CHARGE with proof of the following insurances: Aetna, Cigna, DMBA, Educators Mutual, Healthy Premier, Medicaid, Medicare, MotivHealth, PEHP, Selecthealth, Tall Tree Administrators, & United Health

Print and fill out the Consent form before attending to save time AND reduce contact!

2021 Flu Shootout Events

WASHINGTON COUNTY

  • EVENT COMPLETEDFlu shots are now available at the HEALTH DEPARTMENT (LINK) on a walk-in basis or through many pharmacies & healthcare providers.

IRON COUNTY

  • EVENT COMPLETEDFlu shots are now available at the HEALTH DEPARTMENT (LINK) on a walk-in basis or through many pharmacies & healthcare providers.

BEAVER COUNTY

  • EVENT COMPLETEDFlu shots are now available at the HEALTH DEPARTMENT (LINK) on a walk-in basis or through many pharmacies & healthcare providers.

GARFIELD COUNTY

  • Thursday, October 21 @ Panguitch Fire Station (40 N. 100 E., Panguitch)
    • 12-5pm (drive-thru for ages 18+ or walk-in for families and all ages)

KANE COUNTY

  • EVENT COMPLETEDFlu shots are now available at the HEALTH DEPARTMENT (LINK) on a walk-in basis or through many pharmacies & healthcare providers.

Before attending, please:

  • Download consent form [ENGLISH] [SPANISH]. Print, fill out, and bring with you to save time AND reduce contact!
  • Wear a short-sleeved shirt
  • Bring a mask 
  • Please stay home if you are not feeling well

Q&A

Who should get a flu shot? The CDC recommends everyone age 6 months or over get vaccinated against the flu every year, although it’s especially important for people over the age of 65, children, pregnant women, and people with underlying health conditions, since they are more at risk for serious illness and hospitalization form the flu.

Should I wait between the flu shot and a COVID-19 shot? No, the CDC states that you can get those shots as close together as you want, even during the same visit.


NEWS AND RESOURCES

2021 – 2022 Flu

  • 

COVID-19 and Vaccine Information

  • 

COVID-19 Update – November 3, 2020

COVID-19 Update

David W. Blodgett MD, MPH (SWUPHD Director & Health Officer)

Scientific understanding of the COVID-19 pandemic, along with rapid advancements in medical and public health capacity to deal with patients – and the virus itself – are ongoing. 


Our understanding of the disease

Local, state, and federal data has allowed us a clear picture of who is most impacted by this disease, and helps tailor a better approach for prevention and containment.  It is evident that those who are over the age of 65 are much more affected. Of those who are tested and are positive for COVID-19, the following is true: 28% of those over age 85 will require hospitalization.  21% of those aged 65-84 will require hospitalization, 7% of those aged 45-65 will require hospitalization, 3% of those aged 25-45, and less than 1% of those under 25 will require hospitalization. 

It is equally clear that there are well defined risk factors that influence whether someone will fare poorly with this disease.  These factors include  obesity, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease (not to include mild or moderate asthma), being immunocompromised, and substance abuse.  94% of those who have passed away from this disease were known to be either in one of the older age groups, had an underlying disease risk factor, or both.  Overall, the risk of death from COVID-19 in Utah is .7%, but it is 18% for those over 85 and 5% for those 70-84. It is .6% for those 50-70, and below that it rapidly drops to less than .01%.  These numbers only reflect the cases that we are aware of because they were tested.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) did serology testing in Utah and estimated that there are 11 cases for every case that we detect.  This means that the true hospitalization and fatality rates are much lower. 

80% of the spread of this disease happens from 10% of the cases.   Most infections happen in families or social groups; about 85% of the time an infected person is able to identify who gave it to them.   Sometimes people are exposed at work, when they travel, or in other situations – but that is the exception.  The vast majority of transmission happens when two people are within 6 feet of each other for more than 15 minutes.  This is a disease of close contact.  Most cases are infectious for about 5 days starting 5-7 days after they are infected.  The ability to rapidly identify those who are infectious, rather than those that are merely infected, is the question most important to public health. 

Interventions for COVID-19

Medications and medical interventions:  Advancements in the understanding of how to treat this disease (and what to do and not do) in the medical setting have dramatically changed the nature of what it means to have COVID-19.  The average COVID-19 stay in the hospital is less than 7 days where it was once more than three weeks. 

Vaccine:  Progress toward a safe and effective vaccine continues.  Over a hundred vaccines are in development. Six are in the final stages of testing, called Phase 3 trials.  We are ramping up our efforts to prepare for the delivery of COVID-19 vaccines in our area.  It is hoped that the vaccine will be available in large quantities by spring 2021.

Testing:  The ability to access rapid, cheap, readily available testing for Sars Cov-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) will be a game changer in our response to this disease.  Identifying infectious cases in real time (within 15 minutes) through frequent testing will overcome most of the challenges we have in halting the spread.  Abundant rapid antigen tests would allow us to test everyone going into nursing homes, restaurants, or just making social visits.  Numbers of cases in the community would plummet. Unfortunately, these tests are still too expensive and not available in quantities that would ultimately make a difference, but progress is being made.  The rationale for this testing approach is addressed well in these two articles.  The first is more accessible, the second is a scientific paper. 

https://harvardmagazine.com/2020/08/covid-19-test-for-public-health

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.22.20136309v3.full.pdf+html

Priorities for the future

Protecting those most at risk should be our highest priority.  Testing sites should allow for rapid testing and easy accessibility that will provide testing before entering a high-risk situation, rather than wondering if you are exposing your co-workers or someone you love to this disease.  Until that time, we will prioritize our testing capacity to focus on those who work with both the elderly and people with underlying health conditions. 

Personal responsibility must be a cornerstone of how we seek to meet the risks posed by COVID-19.  Everyone can spread this disease, so please carefully consider what you can do to protect the high-rick people around you. 

Because this is a disease that spreads primarily through close contact with someone that has symptoms of the disease, basic public health measures can go far to help you in your quest to avoid the illness.  Staying home when you are sick is critical, keeping physical distancing to at least six feet as much as possible, washing your hands, and wearing masks all add up to reduce the chances of infection. 

Accepted Insurances

The Southwest Utah Public Health Department currently accepts and bills to the following insurance companies.

Please verify your plan benefits with your insurance company before receiving services and bring your insurance card with you when visiting the health department.


Aetna

CHIP

Cigna

DMBA (Deseret Mutual)

Educators Mutual

Healthy Premier

Medicaid

Medicare

MotivHealth

PEHP

Select Health

Tall Tree

United Health

Pools, Water Parks, and Spa Guidelines

Pools, Water Park, and Spa Guidelines

Updated 10/13/2020


As of October 13, 2020, a new tracking system has been enacted by Governor Herbert and the Utah Department of Health. The color coded Phased Guidelines are now a three-tier system. For updated information specific to industry and county, please visit the link below.

Church Services

Church Services Phased Guidelines

Updated 10/13/2020


As of October 13, 2020, a new tracking system has been enacted by Governor Herbert and the Utah Department of Health. The color coded Phased Guidelines are now a three-tier system. For updated information specific to industry and county, please visit the link below.

High Risk Guidelines

High Risk Individual Phased Guidelines

Updated 10/13/2020


As of October 13, 2020, a new tracking system has been enacted by Governor Herbert and the Utah Department of Health. The color coded Phased Guidelines are now a three-tier system. For updated information specific to industry and county, please visit the link below.

Gathering Guidelines

Gathering Phased Guidelines

Updated 10/13/2020


As of October 13, 2020, a new tracking system has been enacted by Governor Herbert and the Utah Department of Health. The color coded Phased Guidelines are now a three-tier system. For updated information specific to industry and county, please visit the link below.